TRANSITION — The Intention Behind the Collection

We live in a time full of transitions, changes and transformations. The fact that we urgently need sustainable improvements in climate politics will hopefully remain permanently anchored in the minds of politicians and society thanks to the relentless protests of the Fridays for Future demonstrations.

Did you know that by 2019 we have generated more than 6.2 billion tons of plastic waste? Still today, just 14% of plastic waste is recycled, 40% of it goes to landfills and 14% is burned. The remaining 32% ends up in the environment, in the oceans and other bodies of water, or is dumped or burned uncontrolled.1

Still, only 14% of plastic waste is recycled worldwide.
Still, only 14% of plastic waste is recycled worldwide.

The issue of marine pollution, the impact on the climate and especially the protection of the oceans is close to our hearts. We don’t just want to make surf bikinis, because for us the oceans are more than just a wave to surf. That’s why we follow our 3Rs principles when developing and designing our swimwear: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Our desire and goal is to make products that impact nature as little as possible, while still being durable and providing the functionality needed for surfing. You can read more about our materials and vision on our environment page.

With this year’s Aesthetics Collection Transition we are taking it one step further and putting it entirely under the sign of sustainability. As designers we believe in the power and potential of good product design and want to use it to draw maximum attention to this issue and keep the debate alive.

Let’s be honest, how nice would it be if we could communicate our everyday life and collections exclusively with summer, sun, and easy surf lifestyle. But the facts demand a different language: up to 18,000 different pieces of plastic are floating on every square kilometer of ocean surface. The sad consequence of this is that over 135,000 marine mammals die every year and even 1 million seabirds lose their lives because of it.2

The colorful shimmering oil film on a water surface served as an incentive for the creation of the
The colorful shimmering oil film on a water surface served as an incentive for the creation of the “Transition” print — © Monclair Rowing

We have consciously decided not to exclude this and to let our color palette strike a melancholic tone this time. Especially with our print we want to pick up different aspects of the subject and express our thoughts on marine pollution: Deduced from colorful shimmering oil films on the water surface, the muted, merging wave forms were created. Waves, among which brownish and yellowish hues are mixed, but which ultimately do not belong in the depths and wideness of the oceans and therefore symbolize their pollution.

But in the waves, with their various shades and nuances, we also see the power of the earth. A power that we want to use to fight on and look into the future with hope: We need to give our oceans a break! Researchers have found that in up to 30 years many marine biotopes can recover almost completely.3

The collection is a constant reminder that the diversity of nature cannot be taken for granted. Become an ambassador too by telling the story behind your Oy bikini to create more awareness and attention to this issue and bring the discussion to the outside world.

Take action, tell the story behind your Oy Bikini and raise awareness in society about our environment.
Take action, tell the story behind your Oy Bikini and raise awareness in society about our environment.

Find out about actions in your city and neighborhood and get involved in petitions. How about a beach clean-up on your next vacation? But also the small park around your corner can be cleaned up at any time.

For each product sold from the Transition collection we donate 1 SFR/€ to the initiative of cleanoceanproject.org

1 PLASTIKATLAS 2019 – Daten und Fakten über eine Welt voller Kunststoff, Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung und Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland, 2. Auflage, Juli 2019.
2 NABU – Müllkippe Meer – Plastikmüll und seine tödlichen Folgen (4/21)
3 Duarte, C.M., Agusti, S., Barbier, E. et al. Rebuilding marine life. Nature 580, 39–51 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2146-7

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